Polperro: not just although mainly about the fishing

Lansallos parish contains part of the coastal village of Polperro (shared with the neighbouring parish of Talland). Now the epitome of a ‘quaint’ and picturesque Cornish village, Polperro in the 1800s was a self-contained and busy working village, its people earning their living mainly from fishing. Jonathan Couch with one of his fish Self-contained but … Continue reading Polperro: not just although mainly about the fishing

Lanreath: the Giant’s Hedge and giant leaps

The Giant's Hedge near Lanreath (Adrian Platt / CC BY-SA 2.0) William Toms grew up on his father’s 150-200 acre farm at Bocaddon in Lanreath in east Cornwall. Bocaddon was found less than a mile north of the churchtown of Lanreath. However, between the two there lay the inscrutable feature of the Giant’s Hedge. This large earthwork … Continue reading Lanreath: the Giant’s Hedge and giant leaps

Lanlivery: attempts at catering and hints of the coming century

Former tin streaming works on Redmoor, now a nature reserve (Mark Camp / Redmoor nature reserve / CC BY-SA 2.0) Lanlivery in mid-Cornwall was a parish of contrasts. Its boundaries encompassed the granite Helman Tor capped by its neolithic enclosure and the elusive Redmoor, often preceded by the adjective ‘mysterious’. But it also contained wooded valleys leading down to … Continue reading Lanlivery: attempts at catering and hints of the coming century

Laneast: escaping a life of farm labouring

John Couch Adams Laneast is one of those small agricultural parishes to the west of Launceston. However, even small parishes could often take pride in some claim to fame. Laneast was the birthplace of John Couch Adams (1819-1892), a Cambridge professor who predicted the existence of the planet Neptune. Most residents of the parish in … Continue reading Laneast: escaping a life of farm labouring

Landulph: hired assassins and (more) Victorian coppers

Cornwall’s connections with the eastern Mediterranean via Tintagel in the fifth and sixth centuries are familiar. Less well-known is that Landulph, now a sleepy backwater beside the River Tamar, also had a somewhat unexpected association with Byzantium. In the church is an inscription recording the burial of Theodore Palaeologus in 1636. Palaeologus claimed that he … Continue reading Landulph: hired assassins and (more) Victorian coppers

Landrake: contrasting personal geographies

Landrake is a parish in south-east Cornwall straddling the main road from Saltash to Liskeard. Now part of Plymouth’s commuter belt, in the nineteenth century it was predominantly farming country. Nonetheless, the village housed the usual quota of shopkeepers and craftsmen. The life courses of two children from non-farming backgrounds provide a contrasting tale of … Continue reading Landrake: contrasting personal geographies