Surname maps – 1861

From this page you can access maps of surnames in Cornwall in 1861. These include all surnames borne by 100 or more households plus surnames with more than ten households that were more common in Cornwall than the rest of Britain. Most of these appear in my The Surnames of Cornwall, where you can find some more details.

Allen to Buzza

Caddy to Currah

Dabb to Guy

Hain to Knuckey

Ladner to Oxnam

Paddy to Runnalls

Sambells to Sweet

Tabb to Tyzzer

Udy to Yeo

7 thoughts on “Surname maps – 1861

    • You won’t find them because they’re not there. As you’ll realise I couldn’t include every name and my cut-off was at least 10 households with that name (or variants of it) in 1861. Unfortunately, there were only four Trenhaile households in the census (actually two Trenhale and two Trenhaile). But I can tell you three of them lived in Feock and the other in nearby Kenwyn.

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  1. I’ve traced my family name, Greenaway, continually, back to the commencement of Parish Records in the sixteenth century for the village of Kilkhampton, near Bude. They were definitely there in 1861. ALso they are in St Breward at that time. What is the point of producing a list if you do not include long-established families?

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    • ‘Long-established’ wasn’t part of the criteria for selection, which is fully explained in my book (p.xv). Sadly, the line had to be drawn somewhere and names with fewer than 50 instances in 1861 had to be more common in Cornwall than elsewhere. There were 33 Greenaway/Greenway households in 1861 but the name was more frequent in southern England than in Cornwall.
      However, rest assured that later this year I’m hoping to add maps for all surnames with more than 25 occurrences but that were left out of the 760 in the book. That will clearly include Greenaway.

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      • Many thanks for your explanation. I’m pleased we Greenaways will be included in the new maps, and look forward to seeing them.

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  2. Hi Bernard, Hours of ‘fun’ with your recent book. Really good stuff. Maybe an even bigger book one day, to satisfy everyone?

    Just wondering re (p101) Letcher: http://geiriadur.ac.uk/gpc/gpc.html?llaethwr

    … along the lines of Laity (p96) & Trahair (p161). By your maps, whereas those two are clearly western, the 1861 distribution of Letcher is a bit ambiguous geographically.

    Not attested in the texts or vocabularies, but then, neither is this headword.

    Thanks for the book.

    PJ

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