Luxulyan: the death of a way of life

Streaming from an illustration of 1556 In the mid-Victorian era the parish of Luxulyan contained one of the two districts (the other being Carnmenellis in the west) where a considerable number of men were given the older occupational term  ‘tinner’ rather than miner, 'tinner' being an alternative term for a tin streamer. Moreover, tinners in … Continue reading Luxulyan: the death of a way of life

Liskeard: Victorian Cornwall’s boom town

In the 1830s copper ore reserves were discovered on Caradon Hill on the southern edge of Bodmin Moor near Liskeard. Soon after, in 1843, rich lead deposits were noted to the south east at Menheniot and to the south of the town. In consequence Liskeard became Cornwall’s boom town in the 1840s as several mines … Continue reading Liskeard: Victorian Cornwall’s boom town

Kea: when the fish and tin had gone, what did the Cornish boys do?

When South Crofty mine closed in the late 1990s some poignant graffiti appeared on a wall. So what did ‘Cornish boys’ do when the mines were no longer the obvious career route? One option, as we have seen, was to follow the mines overseas. Another was to stay put, or move within the UK, and … Continue reading Kea: when the fish and tin had gone, what did the Cornish boys do?